wheniwas19 Year in Review

2009 has been one strange year.

January. Organic, where I was working as their Manager of Integrated Media, moved me from Creative to Technology. Like the Dude, I abide.

July. I was hired at henderson bas as their Director of New Media. Five weeks later, I quit and went freelance. A bad fit is a bad fit and I was a bad fit at henderson bas.

September. I spoke at Flash on the Beach in Brighton. I outlined what I considered the 10 Best Excuses to NOT do Amazing Work. I then went on to do the same presentation for Sheridan College, Seneca College and a mini-version for the monthly FlashinTO gathering.

December. I worked on a little thing for Galaxy Goo.

From July until now, I was/am working on Tattoocapture. As of this moment, it’s still in progress.

My first freelance project went live. Very Exciting.

The Estée Lauder site I worked on with many others in 2008, won some awards this year.

I’m looking forward to 2010. If 2009 is any indication, I’m in for some fun. I like working. If you have some work for me, email me at hugh [at] wheniwas19 [dot] com to get in touch!

5 thoughts on “wheniwas19 Year in Review”

  1. I think Flash development can live under the "technology" umbrella. Specially, AS3 development: Flash projects can be run like software projects, because they are software projects that look prettier than the typical software projects we're used to (e.g., lots of gradients and colorful dropdown menus as opposed to white textboxes and gray buttons).

    In other words, the UI is as sharp as it can get, but the functionality and implementation of the business logic driving the applications remain the same (both with Flash and traditional software engineering).

    From a management perspective, do you think they are fundamentally different?

  2. Jose, I have proven that Flash can exist in either the Creative or Technology Departments. They're not different, management-wise.

    My "I abide" comment was in reference to not being consulted in the decision and simply moved.

  3. I think Flash development can live under the “technology” umbrella. Specially, AS3 development: Flash projects can be run like software projects, because they are software projects that look prettier than the typical software projects we’re used to (e.g., lots of gradients and colorful dropdown menus as opposed to white textboxes and gray buttons).In other words, the UI is as sharp as it can get, but the functionality and implementation of the business logic driving the applications remain the same (both with Flash and traditional software engineering).From a management perspective, do you think they are fundamentally different?

  4. Like I said, Steve, I think it can comfortably reside in either. It all depends on what you’re doing with it.

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